Storium Theory: Play to Your Cards!

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on 11/24/2015. Cards in Storium represent point values on challenges: +1, -1, and 0, effectively, for Strength, Weakness, and Neutral respectively. But they are so much more than that. Each card in Storium represents something important–a character trait, an item, a theme, a plot, a piece of a character’s history, or what-have-you. Each is an element of the story. When you play a card, don’t think just in terms of the card’s numeric value. When you compose your move, don’t just think about the impact on the challenge–important as that is! Think about what the card was. What did it represent? I went over this a bit in my article on having an impact. If you play a Strength card,...

Episode 19 FEEDBACK!!!!

Episode 19! In this episode the hosts talk about finding Art and we read the feedback from our contest. Show Notes 00:00 intro 00:47 Contest Winner 1:42 Finding Art 14:55 Feedback 67:00 Sign off Links: Art: Google Images: https://images.google.com/ Creative Commons search: https://search.creativecommons.org/ Wikimedia / Wikipedia: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_Page HeroMachine: http://www.heromachine.com/ Pixabay: https://pixabay.com/ Shutterstock: http://www.shutterstock.com/ Alan Dotson – Monster a Day – Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/allandotson?ty=h Fotolia.com – great selection and easier prices than Shutterstock: https://us.fotolia.com/ – if you buy the smallest size, still very usable, it’s usually about a $1 to $1.50...

Storium Theory: Make an Impact!

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on 11/19/2015. If you come from a tabletop game or MUX background, you have a decent background for Storium. You’re already used to the idea of a group of people teaming up to tell a story, and depending on the system of choice, you may even be used to a pretty good amount of player control over the story. But Storium is still something of a different beast than the usual tabletop game or MUX. In Storium, challenge resolutions aren’t about the individual actions–each swing of a sword or quiet step down a hallway–but about the overall situation–the battle, or the stealth mission through the building. What does this mean, in practice? What it means is that Storium does not, in general,...

Storium Theory: Writing Good Strengths and Weaknesses

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on 11/17/2015. Strength and Weakness cards are perhaps the central elements of the Storium system. On the surface, they’re pretty easy to understand–a Strength is something your character is good at, a Weakness is something they’re bad at, right? Right. The thing is, it isn’t always all that easy to write good Strengths and Weaknesses. It’s easy to end up feeling somewhat trapped by the ones you’ve written, if you write them in a particular way, or interpret them in a particular way. To explain my theory on Strengths and Weaknesses, I have to start out by briefly addressing my concept of how Storium’s Challenges work. There’s a lot of different interpretations on...

Storium Theory: When Players Retire

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on 11/11/2015. One of the most difficult things that can happen in a Storium game is a player retirement, especially if it is sudden or unexpected. It can leave plot threads dangling, break character relationships, and potentially kill a game. What do you do? There are a few options. You can let the character just disappear from the story, ignoring him without a word…but that just breaks the plots or relationships that revolved around him. You can kill off the character or have him leave the party, to at least close off his plots in some ways…but that can be unsatisfying narratively at best and ruin other characters at worst. It can work well in a horror game, but few other story types really allow...

Storium Theory: Getting the Right Cast

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on 11/11/2015. When you come up with an idea for a new game, it can be really tempting to start it as soon as you get some applications for it. “I need four players,” you think, “and here, there’s four applications! Time to accept them and go!” Don’t think that way. I advise taking your time, letting the standard application timeline run its course, or at least get close. See what comes in. For a Storium game, getting the right cast is vital. If you’re narrating, you need to wait. Let the apps come in. And then…review them. Take a long, hard look at the characters. Make sure you really, truly understand them. See what ones seem like they would play off each other...

Storium Theory: Story Scope

Hello, everyone. I’m Robert Mohr, @Matjaza on Storium, and blogger at Gaming Creatively, where I discuss tabletop RPGs, character creation in video games, 3d art tools, and most recently and extensively, Storium. I’ve started posting articles on things I’ve learned over the course of my time as a Storium player and narrator in hopes of helping other players and narrators. I’ve been asked to start cross-posting the Storium content here, and I’ll be doing so on a regular basis. I’ll be posting three times a week starting out until this content is caught up with my blog, and then I will start posting things one day after they appear on Gaming Creatively. These posts are my own views and do not necessarily reflect the reviews of...