Episode 20! Interview with Storium Co-Founder and Lead Engineer Josh Qhiting

In this episode, Mike and Justin speak with Co-Founder and Storium’s Lead Engineer  Josh Whiting  Show Notes 00:00 intro 00:50 Interview 65:00 Sign off   Josh Whiting Co-Founder & Lead EngineerCO–FOUNDER & LEAD ENGINEER Josh has also spent his entire career working on technology, specifically as an engineer and architect. He was a senior engineer at Craigslist, and was engineering manager at Delicious. In his spare time he is a composer of electronic music. Josh and Stephen have worked together for years, across four differnt startups. Links: delicious.com If you want to submit your resume, send it here contact@storium.com Justin – @Twisted_Gnome Aaron – @MacStainless Kaitlyn -@ ThatOneDM Miki -@MikiTracey...

Storium Theory: Giving Up Control

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on 12/22/2015. When last we met, I said I’d write a little on using other player characters in Storium. Now’s the time! Storium is an unusual system–a play-by-post system that’s much more about collaborative writing than anything else. A lot of its players, though, come from tabletop RPGs, MUXes, or other backgrounds where who controls what is pretty strict. This can hurt a Storium game. Storium works best, I’ve found, when players all have a little control over everything, without having to ask. Players can control NPCs, narrators can control PCs, and players can control other player characters–to an extent. How great an extent varies by game and group dynamics, but there...

Storium Theory: Leaving Things Open

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on 12/17/2015. In my last post on the narration associated with challenges, I wrote for a little bit on how proper narration could give players some cues to work off of in their posts and spark their imagination. That got me thinking a bit…because that’s something players can do as well. I’ve written a bit before about how to write an interesting move, play to your cards, and take charge of the story…but there’s one other technique that can really help with game flow and inspire your fellow players: leave things open. When you play one of the cards that doesn’t conclude a challenge–any but the last, effectively–you’re taking action in a situation that...

Storium Theory: Setting Up a Challenge, Part 4–Narration

Happy New Year! This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on 12/15/2015. Today is the final post of my series on setting up a challenge in Storium. Previously, we’ve covered the Name and Description, the Rating, and the Results. Today, we’ll be talking about Narration. Challenges aren’t all about the game mechanics. They need to be supported by your actual narration, making them part of the game world. Storium is a blend of storytelling and system, and in order to work properly, your challenges need to be set up not just mechanically, but in the story text as well. There is more to this than just describing the basic start of an event, or giving a dry statement of the objective. Your narration is where you set the tone, the mood of the...

Storium Theory: Setting up a Challenge, Part 3–Results

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on 12/10/2015. Welcome back to my series on setting up challenges. We’ve been through the Name and Description in one prior post, and the Rating in another. Now, it’s time to talk about the Results. Each challenge has a Strong result and a Weak result. The basic purpose of these is to guide the writing of the player who completes the challenge if it comes out Strong or Weak – to tell the player what events or information need to be included in his writeup. (The narrator writes the challenge conclusion in the case of an Uncertain result.) There are a wide variety of ways to write the results statements. Some narrators like to spell things out in detail, while others like to leave a lot up to the...

Storium Theory: Setting Up a Challenge, Part 2–Rating

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on 12/8/2015. In the first part of my series on setting up a challenge, I talked about naming the challenge and writing its description, two important elements that help set the challenge’s focus. See Setting Up a Challenge, Part 1 if you’d like to read up on those. Next up is playing the challenge card. The first thing to set up on the card is the number of points on the challenge, which directly corresponds to the number of cards the characters will be required to play to complete it. I usually call this the challenge rating. How do you decide how many points to set on a challenge? The first instinct of any RPG GM will be to set it based on the difficulty of the situation–to set things at 1 or...

Storium Theory: Setting Up a Challenge, Part 1–Name and Description

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on 12/3/2015. Reposting a day early here due to tomorrow being Christmas and all. For those who celebrate it, Merry Christmas! 🙂 I’ve talked a bit on this blog about the player side of dealing with challenges, but I haven’t really gone into the very basics of challenges yet. So today, we’ll start off a series of posts on challenge design. A lot of it is pretty easy to understand: challenges essentially represent “things that stand in the way” in a story. Maybe it is a situation, or an item, or a character…whatever the case, a challenge is something that the player characters need to deal with as the story progresses. As narrator, your job is to identify the things that become...