Episode 23! An Awesome Talk With The Very Amazing Gina Trujillo

In this episode, we meet Gina Trujillo.   Show Notes 00:00 Intro 00:00 Meet our Guest host Gina Trujillo 00:00 How to get back into the flow of Storium 00:00 Trigger Warnings 00:00 Outro Guest Host Bio: Writer, comic book artist, and all around geek. Co-creator of Bobble Kitty Comics. Playing in text-based online RPGs for 15+ years.  Links: Storium Games: https://storium.com/game/the-wizard-is-missing/chapter-1/scene-1(complete) https://storium.com/game/field-trip-into-darkness/chapter-1/scene-1(complete) https://storium.com/game/dirge-of-eurydice-a-short-story/act-1/scene-1(complete) https://storium.com/game/the-deadman-switch/act-1/scene-1 https://storium.com/game/galvan-academy/chapter-1/scene-1 Non Storium http://narunetok.bobblekitty.com/...

Storium Theory: House Rules: Single-Card Plays

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on March 8th, 2016. I’d like to discuss something a little different today–rather than looking at an aspect of the Storium system itself, I’d like to look at the relative merits of a “house rule” of sorts–a requirement a narrator might impose on his game, outside of the general rules of the Storium system. As with any gaming system, narrators in Storium sometimes find that the rules as written don’t quite suit what they’re going for, or feel that they need to specify something extra to get play to work the way they’d like. Today, I’m going to write on one such rule that I’ve encountered: “Only single-card plays allowed.” My last post...

Episode 22! A really late discussion with Alex Rodriquez

In this episode, we meet A.M. Rodriguez. We talk about Storium fan projects and have a heated discussion about the future of Storium. Show Notes 00:00 Intro 00:50 Meet our Guest host A. M. Rodriguez 19:35 Storium Fan-Works 36:15 Storium Going Live (Sorry this is so late) 93:44 Outro Guest Host Bio: Alex is a celebrated nobody who hasn’t accomplished much within his lifetime, except get confused for other random individuals. An NPC by nature you can usually find Alex scuttering about in the background engaged in hobbies which interest him, such as: tabletop gaming, writing various fantastical stories, tapping his artistical and creative nature, and falling victim to the ravaging beast of procrastination which do not allow him to complete his writing or artistic...

Storium Theory: Multi-Card Moves

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on March 3rd, 2016. I’ve spent the last couple of posts discussing cardless moves…now, it’s time to dive back in to the cards. In Storium, you can play up to three cards in a single move (and, incidentally, up to three cards in a scene as a whole, which is used to limit the total narrative impact any one character can have in a scene). Sometimes, you might decide to play only one at a time, while at other times you might choose to play two or even three in a single move. This is actually a pretty major decision. In game system terms, the more cards you play on a single move, the less card-based moves you’re making in a scene, but the more that single move pushes the challenge forward in...

Storium Theory: A Chance to Breathe: Cardless Moments

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on March 1st, 2016. Today, I’d like to continue my discussion of cardless moves in the Storium system. Last time I discussed the power of cardless moves in the context of a challenge…today, I’d like to continue by discussion overall cardless moments in a story – points where no challenges have been set up, but the scene is left open for roleplaying. A quick clarification: this post is not about games that try to run entirely without the Storium system. Those are a totally different matter, basically just systemless play using Storium‘s site to provide a meeting place. I’ve done some systemless games before and they can work (though they require a closely knit group of...

Storium Theory: Add Some Color with Cardless Moves

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on February 25th, 2016. I spend a lot of time on this blog writing about how you can use Storium‘s system to support a good story. I write about setting up challenges, playing cards, choosing your cards, and all sorts of ways to use the system to guide your storytelling. But there’s something I’d like to discuss today that, in a way, is the inverse of that…an element of Storium‘s system that I haven’t much mentioned on the blog yet. Cardless moves. Storium does not require a card to be played when you make a move, so moves outside of the “challenge” structure are clearly possible. But…when should you make a move outside the challenge structure, and what should...

Storium Theory: Collaboration – Narrator and Players as a Team

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on February 23rd, 2016. Storium is a collaborative storytelling game. This puts it in a field similar to, but distinct from, many tabletop roleplaying games. I’ve been over this a bit in the past in more specific areas, but today I’d like to discuss the overall concept of collaboration…the art of looking at narrator and players as a team in the service of telling a good story. Many tabletop roleplaying games these days encourage GMs to work with rather than against their players–to build challenges, but always be rooting for the players to succeed (a distinction from the “kill ’em all” playstyle encouraged by some other games closer to the tradition’s wargaming...