Storium Basics: Multi-Card Moves

This post originally appeared at Gaming Creatively on August 17th, 2017. Welcome back to Storium Basics, where I’m covering general aspects of Storium play that I think are helpful to know as you get started. Today, I’m going to cover a slightly more advanced element of Storium. Today, we’re talking about multi-card moves. I’ve already gone over the basics of making a Storium move with a single card back in Storium Basics: Challenges and Cards. For a quick refresher, you’ll select a challenge, select a card, and then write a move that demonstrates how that card’s trait comes into play and affects that challenge, based on the type of card that you’ve selected, the challenge, the possible challenge outcomes, the...

Storium Basics: Assets and Goals

This post originally appeared at Gaming Creatively on August 10th, 2017. We’ve already discussed Storium‘s first (and my favorite) Neutral card type, the Subplot, but that’s not the only Neutral card type in Storium. Today, I’m going to discuss the other two types: Assets and Goals. Unlike all the other cards in Storium, Assets and Goals are not things that you start with – they aren’t part of your character from the beginning, and they aren’t chosen at Refreshes or upon spending a stack or anything like that. Whether you have these cards or not isn’t up to you, entirely – it depends on the narrator. These are both given to players – or provided for pickup – by the narrator at his will. Assets...

Storium Basics: Playing Off Each Other

This post originally appeared at Gaming Creatively on July 20th, 2017. Welcome back to Storium Basics, where each week I’m going through a basic aspect of Storium play. This week, I’m going to talk about something that’s a little bit more advanced: playing off of each other and leaving openings.  Storium games are stories, and that means that scenes work best when they feel interconnected. It’s easy to lose sight of that when you are writing independently, often at different times from the other players. However, it is important to make a conscious effort to tell a continuous story between your moves and those of other players. You’re not just writing the tale of your own character – you are writing the story of the challenge,...

Storium Basics: Subplots

This post originally appeared at Gaming Creatively on July 13th, 2017. My apologies for the delay on getting it over here – thought I had done it when I set it up to post and only just realized I hadn’t. O_O Welcome back to Storium Basics – today, I’d like to briefly discuss the Subplot card type. Subplots are actually my favorite card on Storium. The other cards show your character’s impact on the story—a subplot shows the story’s impact on your character. Subplot cards are considered neutral, so they don’t affect the Strong/Weak balance of a challenge. They do, however, push things closer to a conclusion. I like to use them to set up situations that might go either way, or to emphasize the way the challenge is currently going while...

Storium Basics: Challenges and Cards

This post originally appeared at Gaming Creatively on July 6th, 2017. Continuing my Storium Basics series, today we’ll be taking a look at the basic gameplay mechanics of the Storium system. Storium is played, primarily, by making moves that lay cards onto challenges. These cards tell the story, move by move, of what happens during the challenge. When you play a card, write a move explaining what your character does, and how those actions impact the challenge. The effect depends on the card you played. Strength cards improve the situation covered by the challenge. Weakness cards make it worse. Neutral cards, which might be subplots, assets, or goals, push it closer to conclusion without making things feel better or worse. To think of it from another angle:...

Storium Theory: Optional Challenges

This post originally appeared at Gaming Creatively on June 8th, 2017. Most of the time, when we put down a challenge, it’s definite – a note that the story will be focusing on a particular point. But is it possible to use challenges differently? To lay down a challenge for something the players might want to focus on, but are not required to focus on? I believe it is a tool for the toolbox…but one I would show great caution in using. I’ve only pulled out an optional challenge once or twice in my own games, and I am wary of using them often, if at all, in my own narration generally. Storium’s rules are set up more for completion of challenges and requiring of challenges, and I think there’s a good reason for that. In setup, an...