Storium Theory: Narrator Types

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on May 5th, 2016. Every narrator is different, just like every player is different. It’s an important thing to understand when playing Storium. Different narration styles may run different sorts of games. That’s one reason it’s a good idea to take a look at the game history–if available–of a narrator when you think about applying for a game–if you look at what the narrator has run before, you can see hints as to how they handle their games, how the plots are structured, how the challenges are used, and other factors that may affect your ability to mesh with the narrator’s style. There are all sorts of variants, large and small, in narration styles, but what I want to...

Storium Theory: Postmortem–“An End in Fire”

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on May 3rd, 2016. This is the first in a periodic series of articles I’d like to write–postmortems or retrospectives on games that I’ve completed. I’m going to try to get one of these up for every game that I narrate to completion (notable games that I’ve played in that completed may have their own feature later). Warning: Spoilers for stories covered in these articles are not only possible but likely. If you’re interested in these stories from a reading perspective, I suggest reading them first and then coming back to read the Postmortem article. For this first one, I’m looking at An End in Fire, the second game I started narrating and the first that completed (the first...

Storium Theory: Getting Personal: Moral and Amoral

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on April 28th, 2016. Continuing my discussion of character personality types, I’d like to take a moment to bring up two common RPG personality types–the Moral personality, and the Amoral personality. These two types, more than perhaps any other, are ones that I’ve seen interfere with games more than help them. I’m moving away from weekly posts on this topic now (though I will come back to it periodically), but before I did, I wanted to make sure I got this out here. The Moral personality might also be called Righteous. It’s the prototypical true-blue good guy–the character who keeps to the straight and narrow, tries to do what’s right, holds to some kind of moral code,...

Storium Theory: A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on April 26th, 2016. Storium is primarily a text-based game, but not entirely–there is a picture component as well. Characters, Locations, Scenes, and every type of card in the game–all of these can have images associated with them. Some narrators and players use this feature extensively. Others don’t use it much at all. I’m going to come right out and say that I’m one of the ones who doesn’t use it as much. I use it where I feel like it is close to necessary: images for the game header, for locations, and for characters. But other things I tend to leave image-free. Part of this, honestly, is because tracking down images is just…time-consuming. Storium will, as I...

Storium Theory: Getting Personal: Cowardly

This post originally appeared on Gaming Creatively on April 21st, 2016. Let’s dig back in to Getting Personal, my series on character personality types and their positive and negative effects on games. Today, I’d like to discuss the Cowardly personality type. The cowardly character is a character who wears his nervousness and fear on his sleeve. This is the character that says what we’re all thinking when things come up: “This is really bad and any normal person would be terrified.” Any character in a story will have at least some differences from outright reality–reality makes kind of a crappy storyteller, generally–but the cowardly character brings us down from the larger-than-life hero personalities and to the reaction...